Tag

horse care

Barn, dressage, dressage training, equestrian, horse/rider communication

Eyes Up, Looking Where You Want to Go

Through the darkest, most difficult times in my life, horses have been my safe haven — a source of joy and a reminder to live in the present moment. Your mind cannot, should not wander when you’re in the presence of a 1,000-pound animal, no matter how gentle and good-natured he or she may be.
Through this past year, as my mother and I held one another up, watching my father’s health decline, horses remained my reminder that life holds happiness even when sorrows are deep. While I sometimes arrive at the barn with a heavy heart, the familiar faces of my friends and their horses help me set my troubles aside for hours at a time. The barn is a world where priorities are clear and simple. A place where I define myself as a horse person, striving to meet the mind and spirit of another species. I find it deeply satisfying.
As I approach my horse in pasture, his halter in my hand, I bring my best self to him. I’m asking him to leave the leisure of his pasture to come with me, not simply for treats but to do a job that is my idea, not his.

Skipper sees me coming


As I approach, Skipper hears my voice, lifts his head from grazing, and strolls up to me, knowing I’ll have a carrot in my coat pocket. His ears prick forward and he chooses to leave his herd. My heart lifts at the sight. He is saying, “Yes, I’ll come with you.”
Even on the most painful days, where my dad’s memory stings with loss, the simple steps of caring for my horse soothe my soul. I brush Skipper’s coat, admiring its bright chestnut color. I comb out the stubborn shavings that cling to his tail and tidy up his mane. With each grooming, I check to make sure he’s healthy,his shoes are secure, and there are no new lumps, bumps, or bites from pasture mates that need attention.
Before I saddle up, I rub Skipper’s forehead in the spot he’s taught me is his favorite — the white star at the base of his forelock. He nods his head in approval but stands stock still to tell me he appreciates the attention. Skipper likes having a person and I love having a horse. Like happiness itself, a horse is not a thing to take for granted.
As I swing my leg over Skipper’s back, settling gently into the saddle, I remember the words of my trainers … all of whom have reminded me to keep my eyes up, looking where I want to go. Don’t stare at the ground, unless you want to go there, they advised. These words ring true for any riding discipline you choose. And, after this tough, trying year, it strikes me that this is good advice for living, in general.
I chose to buy Skipper just months ago, when I realized that after losing dad, I couldn’t bear yet another loss. My little horse soothes my sorrow and gives me hope for the future. With each riding lesson, I make a plan for what I need to work on, looking for ways we can improve, with hopes for a strong show season. As my relationship with my horse blossoms, my heart heals. My eyes are up and I’m looking toward the future.

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dressage, Horse Care, Horses & Mud, Shedding

Mud Season at the Barn

Temps have soared into the high 40’s and low 50’s, which feels downright balmy after this winter’s frigid temps. We’re happy to say farewell to snow and ice, as it’s easier and safer to walk outside the barn and turn the horses out again. Alas, the ground is soaked with melted snow, which means mud is our new theme. Mud, I did not miss you.

If there’s mud, horses will find it. Elle takes advantage of our False Spring, carefully camouflaging herself to blend in with her paddock. I’m grateful not to own a grey.


As a result of our False Spring weather (Yes, I am bitter! Winter will be back just as soon as we adapt to warmer temps), the horses are beginning to shed. Think buckets of hair.
Combine long-haired horses with muddy turnout and what do you get? A filthy horse, nearly impossible to groom without a bath. Goodbye clean saddle pads. I miss you already.
I admit I was feeling sorry for myself as I turned Micah out after today’s awesome lesson. “The next time I see you, you’ll be a muddy mess,” I said.
But as I turned to go, a blotchy apparition caught my eye. Elle, a normally elegant grey mare, had done a thorough job of camouflaging herself. She looked combat ready.
“Things could be worse,” I thought to myself, grateful that Micah is a bay.
May your own Spring be true and may you and your horses stay happy and healthy through the change of season.

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