dressage, dressage training, lameness, natalie perry dressage

Working Through Lameness

Micah’s had a run of bad luck in the past two weeks — first a minor lameness in the left front, then a small wound on the right hind. At Micah’s age (and mine), a few aches and pains are to be expected – but how we treat them is so important to recovery and longevity. That’s where I’m so grateful to have the help of my trainer, Natalie Perry and assistant trainer, Mari Valceschini.

Having extra sets of eyes on the ground is so useful when considering a lameness. I’ve gotten better at detecting which body parts are involved but it’s great to have those observations confirmed — and get some guidance about recovery.
Today I went out for a lesson knowing Micah had been sore. I was ready to take stock of his current condition and didn’t really expect to have a full lesson. (In contrast, when my very first horse, decades ago, came up lame I was a tearful mess.) I’ve been through this enough times through the years to know that it comes with the territory, so I came prepared to develop a recovery strategy. (I was also grateful that we’re not right in the middle of show season — so there’s no sense of pressure.)
Micah went nicely on the lunge line except for one rambunctious canter depart and looked reasonably sound. I wasn’t sure if he was dragging his right hind toe a little more than usual … or if I was being paranoid. That’s where those extra eyes come in.
Once Micah had warmed up lightly on the lunge line, I got on and let him warm up under saddle, adjusting to my weight. The trot felt pretty good and the canter to the right was close to normal. To the left, the right hind didn’t have quite the push it usually does, making it apparent that although Micah was showing improvement, he wasn’t quite sound.
Natalie suggested I go ahead and do some walk work and test him out again the next day. He’ll be restricted from full pasture turnout, so keeping him moving will be good for him mentally and physically. When on stall rest he gets terribly bored and is constantly calling out to remind everyone that he’s being neglected.
So, this morning I worked on Micah’s marching walk, alternating it with the stretchy walk. It’s good for me to work on lengthening and shortening the reins smoothly, without taking half the arena to get it done.
I also focused on keeping my right hand low, close to the saddle (an ongoing effort for me) and my left leg down and back (another issue). Rather than being discouraging, it was a productive little workout and I felt really happy to be spending some time with my horse.
As for Micah, he thought it was the perfect ride! Lots of treats and little effort. I’m quite sure he was happy we didn’t try to ‘push him through it.’
Again, I’m really grateful to have the support of Micah’s owner and our trainers as we work through this with the well-being of the horse as our foremost concern. I’ve found that taking time with lamenesses and developing a careful recovery program can be very successful — which is so rewarding.