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dressage showing

dressage, dressage showing, Dressage Struggles, natalie perry dressage

Beyond Ribbons: The Unanticipated Training Opportunity

On June 11th and 12th our chapter hosted their annual recognized show. It was a hit. But as with any show, not every ride goes as anticipated.
Near the end of the weekend, I watched in admiration as my trainer, Natalie Perry, schooled a student as her horse refused to enter the show ring. The mare threatened to rear as the pair circled the arena, balking and turning sideways.
Natalie trotted gamely alongside, urging horse and rider forward, but the mare had her rider flummoxed and the pair opted out of their class.
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Undaunted, Natalie led horse and rider into the warm-up ring and put the mare back to work, reconstructing the rider’s shaken confidence as she did so. I was sympathetic — rearing is one of my least favorite things.
When the rider tried to dismount, Natalie said, “Oh, no you don’t.”
The mare had competed successfully in the morning, in an arena that was farther from the barn. Natalie suggested that the mare was hoping to return to her nearby stall. Regardless of the reason, she couldn’t get away with it.
The pair began moving forward again under Natalie’s supervision.
“Don’t take your feelings out on her,” Natalie said. “She’s being good now.”
Sage advice. Most of us know just how hard it is to set frustration and fear aside and simply ride the next moment. It’s easy to want to punish the horse.
I was reminded that, just like a dressage test, riding often asks us to let go of the moment that didn’t go well and focus on what we have in hand in the present.
Once the pair was going freely forward again, Natalie had her student exit and re-enter the warm-up arena several times. The mare balked initially but without much fight. Soon she was entering the ring and going back to work when asked.
As it was the end of the day, show management granted riders permission to school in the show rings after conclusion of the final class. Natalie jumped on the opportunity. The errant mare went straight from warm-up into the show ring and did some good work, without a fuss.
While Natalie had worked the entire weekend competing and coaching, she stuck with her student, making sure her rider had a renewed sense of confidence in her ability to work with the mare. In addition, the mare did not leave the show with an unwanted habit.
The coaching continued even after the mare finished her arena work.
“Walk her all over the show grounds before you get off and take her back to her stall,” Natalie said. “So she doesn’t think she gets to go back to her stall just because the work is done.”
While I enjoyed watching many beautiful rides over the course of the weekend, this ride was one of my favorites. If I could’ve handed out a blue ribbon for it, I would have been happy to reward this dedication to horse and rider. With horses, training needs to be more important than winning.

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dressage, dressage showing, schooling shows, warmup strategy

Butterfly Brain: The Enemy of Dressage

Sunday was my second schooling show of the season. Those of you who show every weekend probably can’t relate to the experience of re-entering the show ring after 7 years off. But perhaps you have some wisdom you can impart. I am sorely in need of wisdom.

Happily, Micah is a Show Master. He understands that (at our level), he’ll need to work hard for five minutes, then receive lots of praise. He’s not too worried about the judge’s box, decorative floral arrangements, or horses falling to pieces in warm-up. Thank goodness.

My previous horses have needed show warm-ups focused on relaxation and staying in the arena. If Micah relaxes any further, he’ll be dozing. My new warm-up strategy needs to be about waking him up and asking him to respond promptly.

Of course, that’s Part B of the strategy. Part A is me embracing the new strategy and rising to the occasion. Easier said than done, given that showing is exhausting, physically and mentally. Just running  from trailer to show office to warm up to show ring wears me out. And, while I’m not actively freaking out, there’s an app running in the background of my brain, wondering if I’ll be able to rise to the occasion mentally.

My mind flits like a butterfly, from thought to though.

In the arena, my mind flits like a butterfly, from thought to thought.

Lest you think I’m a slacker, I try to stay fit. I ride a horse, a mountain bike, hike, lift small weights, and do abdominal crunches to keep something of a core. Come show day, you’d think I was a complete couch potato the way my stamina stutters and fades. Mentally, I’m equally flaccid. My focus comes and goes like a butterfly in a poppy field. My mind flits from moment to moment. Focus/fade. Focus/fade.

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