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Competition Tips

Competition Tips, dressage, dressage competition, Dressage Illustrated

Becoming Show Ready with Dressage Illustrated


With my first show of the season just around the corner, it’s high time to get serious about really learning my Second Level tests.
This will be my first time showing at this level and to say I’m excited is an understatement. Last year at this time Micah and I were studying these same tests when the poor boy got caste in his stall, sending our show season out the window.
Instead of showing, my goal was to bring my horse back to rideable condition. It was pretty scary but, happily, Micah recovered and this year he is going better than ever.So, this is our second chance at Second Level.
To help me along, I pulled out the Dressage Illustrated Second Level booklet and began to study in earnest. I have to say I am impressed. Being a visual person, the illustrations made it easier for me to picture how the movements relate to one another. I feel like I have a better big picture idea of what’s going on. As a result, the tests are easier to memorize and the areas where we need to brush up are popping out at me.
It’s one thing to practice transitions within gaits and from one gait to another, but to practice them in the order they’re required by the test feels very different. As someone who likes to be over-prepared, I’m excited to get back in the saddle with my fix-it list.

If you find dressage tests difficult to visualize, learn, or memorize, give Dressage Illustrated a try. I think you’ll find them to be very useful.
Check out their website and Facebook page for more information about their diagram books and other products.

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Competition Tips, dressage, dressage competition, equestrian

Show Ring Ready with Natalie Perry

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It’s a blast to watch Natalie Perry of Natalie Perry Dressage compete. Her tact and patience is amazing. Baby horse misbehaves, Natalie smiles as if to say ‘What can you do?’ Trained horse wobbles a little and she firmly but gently gives the horse more support.
Natalie’s the first to admit and remind her students that horses are animals, after all. In a recent interview for Flying Changes magazine, Natalie said, “Not everything is going to go your way in the show ring. No matter how hard you practice at home, horses are animals after all. You can’t control everything.” I found this advice reassuring, as I prepare for my next schooling show, determined not to pressure myself into a form of insanity known as Show Nerves.
Natalie also gave this fantastic bit of advice, which I’m using to help me to intensify my focus … since I tend to ride with relatively low expectations (for myself and my horse) when I’m not preparing for a show. “You have to prepare your horse for the level of intensity you’re going to expect in the show ring,” Natalie said. “Otherwise, you’re going to frustrate your horse.” Summed up: it’s not fair to ride ride like a cowgirl six days a week, then expect a dressage horse on show day.
My prep work at home has included incorporating an exercise Natalie recommended, which she learned from Dutch trainer Barbara Koot. “Write down every moment of your test, including every half-halt, bend, and step of preparation you intend to ride,” Natalie said. “Read it until it becomes engrained.”
No matter what level you compete in, your behind-the-scenes work will make a difference in your self-confidence and quality of your ride.
To read the full article go to www.flyingchanges.com or see their October 2015 issue, hot off the press.
To learn more about Natalie Perry go to natalieperrydressage.com

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