dressage, Equine Acupuncture, Equine Chiropractic

Riding, Interrupted

It’s been a tough month for horses here in Central Oregon. Several tragic accidents ended lives quickly, leaving those of us on the sidelines wondering why and how such troubling things happen to good people.
I’m reminded of the adage: Good things take time, bad things happen quickly.
My own horse, Micah, hurt himself and has been enjoying an “all play, no work” regime for the past week. Two chiropractic sessions with a dash of acupuncture thrown in and Micah is to get another week off before we start back riding lightly.

Dr. Taryn Yates of Active Balance starts an acupuncture treatment on Micah

Dr. Taryn Yates of Active Balance starts an acupuncture treatment on Micah


I was caught off guard by this abrupt change of plans and wanted to feel sorry for myself. Riding lessons suspended. Show season on hold. Looking at the big picture, however, my loss is nothing compared to that of my friends who suffered permanent loss this month.
I’m also very fortunate that Dr. Taryn Yates of Active Balance is on Micah’s health care team. Taryn’s chiropractic and acupuncture work is clearly helping, so we’re hoping it’s just a matter of time, paired with hand-walking and some light lunging, to help him loosen up. Seeing the relief in Micah’s eyes as tight spots ‘let go’ is a reward in its own.
So, this is my moment to let ‘good things take time.’ A reminder to be patient and keep the big picture in mind. Hopefully this is a temporary glitch and we’ll be back in the saddle soon.
Dr. Yates takes Micah's vitals before administering a light sedative. Micah tends to tense up during acupuncture without it.

Dr. Yates takes Micah’s vitals before administering a light sedative. Micah tends to tense up during acupuncture without it.


In the meantime, I have a good excuse to spend time at the barn, hoping that healing magic happens for all those who need it.