canter, counter canter, dressage, transitions

The Canter/Walk Epiphany

I find myself having dark moments in dressage. Days where I feel I’m going backwards, struggling with things I thought I was making improvement with. It’s hard not to feel incompetent in these times, so thank goodness for my trainer … she provides moments of hope.
I’ve noticed that my moments of floundering are often followed by a big leap forward. My horse is saying, “No, I couldn’t possibly,” when actually he can. A little extra resolve on my part, coupled with excellent advice from my trainer, Natalie Perry, usually pushes us through a bit of an impasse. It’s the proverbial darkest hour before the dawn.
After a week off (see Achilles Tendon Surgery, husband, not a great week) plus bodywork, Micah’s tried to take over a bit at the canter. There’s nothing like a big horse feeling full of himself, when you’re a bit down in the dumps.
Micah’s also not wild about counter canter and was taking advantage of my lack of expertise on the topic. We were sliding in and out of in-control and out of control.
The solution? The canter/walk transition. I love this exercise and highly recommend it.
We’d been working on the walk/canter transition for the serpentine movement in Second Level, Test 1 … where things were going rather nicely. On my drive home the other day, I had an epiphany — a lightning bolt moment. The canter/walk transition isn’t just a pretty movement in a test, it’s a critical training tool! My brain replayed numerous images of Natalie and Mari throwing in the canter/walk transition anywhere in the arena, as a schooling device. I realized I should be able to get that transition anywhere, at any time!
canterserpentine
This may sound obvious to really experienced riders, but to me this was a breakthrough.
In our most recent lesson, Natalie helped me with this, using an exercise I encourage you to try yourself. Pick up the canter, ride a nice circle, and then start riding across the diagonal. Throw in a canter/walk several times before reaching the next side of the arena. (If your horse is like Micah and sees a straight line as an opportunity to go for it, you’ll love this.)
The first few times, Micah was surprised and a bit offended. Be sure to prepare your horse for the transitions with half-halts, using your seat and core. Once he gets the idea, you can lighten up. This wonderful exercise vastly improved Micah’s left-lead canter, which has always been our weakest.
You can also practice this exercise on a circle, asking for a canter/walk transition anywhere you like. When that’s working well, try a half-halt. If your horse doesn’t respond, got back to canter/walk. When he rewards you with a prompt response, give him a pat — and yourself, too!
Give it a go and let me know what you think!