dressage, dressage training, riding

Getting There is 1/4 of the Fun

Those who know me know that math is not my strong point. There are other ways to say that, most of them less flattering but probably more accurate than any attempt I could make to solve a quadratic equation.
I especially enjoy making up fake statistics. Who’s going to check, anyway?!
Today, driving to the barn was harrowing. Due to shenanigans on the icy roads, it too me 32.1% longer than normal to get to the barns. At least 25% of the drivers were timid, moving along at 15 mph drivers. Another 30% of the drivers were assertively driving 45 mph in their 4WD vehicles, some of them ending up in ditches. That left the remaining 45% of drivers moving along at a somewhat sane speed.

Road to the barn. Packed snow made for exciting driving.

Road to the barn. Packed snow made for exciting driving.


By the time I got to the barn, I decided that 1/4 of the fun was in getting there. I was particularly intrigued by the two women who got their car turned 360-degrees in the opposite lane. I have no idea how they accomplished this going uphill. They were unharmed but bewildered. The oncoming traffic was 100% stalled and not amused.
By the time I reached the barn, the temps were a chilly 24.2 degrees in the sun, so I was sporting a layered-up clothing combination that can best be described as “chunky.” The extra clothing resulted in an 11.2% reduction in my ability to feel attractive, while increasing my heat comfort level by 12.9%, resulting in a net loss of 2.4%.
For the 2nd time in a row, Micah was happy to meet me at the gate of his snow-covered pasture for a carrot. That’s a 19.7% improvement over his usual ‘come and get me’ attitude! There’s a 98.2% chance that the gate-greeting response was food motivated; 1.4% chance that he misses me so much, he’s willing to walk an extra mile (1.609344 kilometers) to see me. Such is the reality of equine love.
I had allowed 1 extra hour (60 minutes) to account for erratic driving experiences, as well as time (19 minutes) for lunging before my lesson. I hate lunging but it’s better than death by dressage.
After only 1.3 emphatic canter departs, Micah indicated that he could handle a lesson with an admirable 89% degree of sanity. It was time to climb aboard.
It’s hard to feel loose and limber in the saddle when you are wearing 12.7% more clothing than usual. I was only able to zip my boots 2/3 of the way up, since the extra layers of long johns, fleece britches, and wooly socks added 9% more bulk, along with warmth.
Despite the cold and a recent lack of work (77% below normal), Micah was 99.7% excellent. He was definitely more warmed up than I was (36.8%) despite my ‘exercise’ on the steering end of the lunge line. We got some good work done (90%!), then bundled Micah up in a 200% snuggly cooler. He returned to his snowy pasture (4 inches deep) with a sense of having done a good day’s work.
Being back on my horse and in the barn, with all of its camaraderie, made the trip well worth the exciting drive. Of this I am 100% certain.