dressage, dressage competition, humor, transitions

A Safe Space to Be a Mere Mortal

It occurred to me that if I’d posted only those photos of my horse and I doing well at our most recent show, the response would have been enthusiastic but much less entertaining.
When I posted the photo of Micah taking a poo at M (for Manure) in my Walk to Poo Transition post, the response was terrific. My friends laughed with me as I sat through what felt like the longest nature break in history.
Following is a replay of that glorious moment, followed by my attempts to regain composure and continue the test. As you can tell, I couldn’t quite believe what had happened. It was definitely a good lesson in letting go and carrying on.

M is for manure. Photo by Andrew Martin

M is for manure. Photo by Andrew Martin


The numerous (and hilarious) comments on my personal Facebook (Lauren Davis Baker) and business page (Dressage for Mere Mortals), and soaring views on my blog (www.dressage mortals. org) told me I’d struck a nerve.
Leaving a steaming pile of manure behind, I try to regroup into a free walk. Photo by Andrew Martin

Leaving a steaming pile of manure behind, I try to regroup into a free walk. Photo by Andrew Martin


Clearly, people can relate to those moments when you put yourself on the line, only to be humbled by things beyond your control. When readers shared their own stories of moments of humility, we strengthened our community. For me, community is what this blog (and riding, itself) is about.
An eternity later, we make it across the diagonal and carry on as if nothing untoward had happened. Off camera, my trainer is (rightfully) laughing her head off. Photo by Andrew Martin

An eternity later, we make it across the diagonal and carry on as if nothing untoward had happened. Off camera, my trainer is (rightfully) laughing her head off. Photo by Andrew Martin


I’d love to post photos of my horse and I looking grand (and at times we really do!) but we see so many impressive photos of upper level riders with natural skill and ability (plus the time to ride), riding horses beyond our price range: horses with more talent and training than most of us will see in this lifetime. Sometimes that’s inspiring – but at times we need reminders that the struggle of the average rider is its own story, worthy of telling.
And so I share my weaknesses, knowing that it takes lots of small moments — and not giving up — to make progress. As riders, of course we have faults! But we live in a culture where admitting faults is sometimes seen as a weakness.
Personally, I’d like to create a safe space where it’s ok to say, “I love dressage but it’s really, really hard for me.”
I invite you to join me in that space. Or at least visit it on occasion, when you need a laugh or encouragement.
A better moment, during the same test.

A better moment, during the same test.